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Ready Player One

ready-player-oneThis past week I picked up 17 books from the library when all my holds came in at once, but when I combined my need to concentrate on a book for more than ten minutes with the overwhelming fog and depression resulting from the election, I found my way through Homegoing but I haven’t quite made it through the next one. So today we have a short but sweet review of a book that unexpectedly caught my imagination last year.

My husband and I subscribe to Loot Crate and one of the boxes we got came with this book. The other half doesn’t read fiction all that much unless it is in comic book form, so this came to me. Ernest Cline crafts the story of a futuristic world, but not the Jetsons’ kind of futuristic. More like a “we used up all the resources and scorched the Earth and now we have to live in giant trailer skyscrapers that save space” kind of futuristic. Most interactions occur within the OASIS, a virtual reality universe. All children have access to the OASIS in order to attend public school and are provided with the headset to allow them to do so. There is a special, very stable currency used in this reality. When the creator of this universe dies and leaves his fortune to the winner of a challenge in his will, the search begins for an Easter Egg within the game, within the virtual reality. Our VERY poor main character goes on a quest for fame, fortune, and survival throughout the OASIS with many new friends to help him.

This is a true underdog story that might hit a little close to home, but its celebration of intelligence and pluck over pure greed and ambition is the feel good story that you may want to sit down with as soon as possible. There is even an exciting twist! And video games! And good vs. evil! And dystopian futures!

Just go read it. You won’t be sorry, I promise.

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One thought on “Ready Player One

  1. Yet another book that I adored as an audiobook (yes, I DO actually read books in paper form on occasion!), mostly for the narration of Will Wheaton. I’ve always felt poor Wesley Crusher got too much shit (he deserves shit, but maybe not so much?) and Mr. Wheaton did a great job. Ernest Cline’s novel was a fun homage to the 80’s… at first. The SO and I listened to it over the course of a very long road trip and by the time we reached the too-conveniently-wrapped-up ending, we were definitely ready to escape our escapism. Things just seemed a bit too easy for the protagonist, ya know? Another great review, Amanda!

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